What’s Your Why?

We’re happy to announce we’re embarking upon an exciting journey with our friends at TREEO.

We need to hear from you!

In the Spring of 2018, our board of directors and leadership team will dive into some Strategic Planning sessions to guide our work into 2020.

This exciting work includes a review of our current Vision, Mission and Values. What will drive these planning sessions is understanding, describing and reaffirming our purpose. This includes COR’s overall purpose but more importantly, the purpose of those who make COR great – you. Our talented employees.

Through a series of fun activities and teambuilding events, we’ll be examining the concept of purpose.

To better understand your purpose, we’ve formed a partnership with our friends at TREEO. Who’s TREEO, you ask? Well, some of you had the opportunity to work with this local organization a few months ago, when they facilitated a series of teambuilding events and innovation incubator activities. They pride themselves on providing an authentic, human experience, and empowering the organizations within our community that make a difference. Most importantly, they’re thrilled to walk alongside us on this journey.

You’re probably wondering – what do we mean by “purpose”?

You wake up every morning, come to work, and do what you do best for those we serve. But why? The answer to this question can be different for everyone, and it reflects the importance you attach to the work you do. It gives what you do meaning, and taps into your idealistic motivations. To get at your purpose, we’ll be examining a single, powerful question: What‘s Your Why?

Click Here to watch our video and to learn more about purpose, and why it’s important to COR to understand yours. A big thanks to our friend and local musician, Prairie Mountain Man, for providing the soundtrack!

Let’s get started!

COR & Treeo

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out.

 

Michael Lavis,

Executive Director

 

Vulnerabilities of Caregivers – John J. McGee

“Although our vulnerabilities and the external threats to our wellbeing are in many ways nothing compared to those of the persons whom we serve, it is important that we recognize our own before dealing further with the vulnerabilities of those whom we serve.

We are all vulnerable to breakdowns in our personal values. Sometimes these can be due to how we feel and what we are experiencing within ourselves; at other times we can be part of a system that makes it harder for us to respond to our shared values. If a caregiver is afraid of being hurt, he/she then becomes more likely to use restraint to control violent behaviors. Or, if a caregiver is depressed, then it is extremely hard to bring joy to others. If we are being beaten and de-valued at home, it is hard to bring non-violence into someone else’s home.

John J. McGee’s “Mending Broken Hearts” CPLS Newsletter

Many of our vulnerabilities are worsened by lack of adequate training and hands-on supervision. Some caregivers are quite isolated and seldom have the opportunity to discuss their problems and search for new responses to challenging situations. It is critical that caregivers recognize their weaknesses and find ways to overcome them. Community leaders need to listen to caregivers and find ways to offer support and encouragement.

Caregivers need to find their own self-worth from themselves, talking frequently, sharing their anxieties, and pointing out their goodness. Our own worth has to be generated from within ourselves. We need to form strong communities.

The question of burnout seems to be always present. Some caregivers give up and attribute their burnout to poor supervision, working in violent settings, receiving little guidance, or low pay. Since we are not only teaching feelings of companionship, but also a sense of community, it is important for caregivers to look at themselves, question their reality, and search for ways for themselves to feel safer, more engaged, and more valued. The first step in this is to step back and examine those things that make us vulnerable.

Let us take a moment to reflect on these aspects of our lives — recognizing these will help us understand better the needs of those whom we serve.”

 

~Excerpt from John J. McGee’s “Mending Broken Hearts” — CPLS Newsletter.

 

Comic Book Club Brings Laughs and Lifeskills

COR, in partnership with Inclusion Regina and the Next Chapter Book Club is hosting a weekly Comic Book Club at Comic Readers Downtown!

Recently featured in the SARC Spring Update, Ben Morris, Comic Book Club Facilitator, had this to say:

“Comic Book Club has been a breath of fresh air. Not only do we get to reacquaint ourselves with our favorite characters and stories old and new, but we get to share them with like-minded friends in a fun and creative environment. Whether we’re reading, story-telling, or just taking out an hour of the day to let loose and laugh, The Club is where it’s at!”

For more information, contact Ben: ben@creativeoptionsregina.ca

 

Partnering to Deliver Sexual Health and Wellness Education in Saskatchewan


COR, in partnership with a number of talented folks, has worked to develop Tell It Like It Is, a Sexual Health and Wellness Educational Curriculum for diverse learners. In an effort to bring it to a wider audience, COR has partnered with the Saskatchewan Association for Community Living (SACL) and the Saskatoon Sexual Health Center to assist in the delivery of Sexual Health and Wellness Training across Saskatchewan.

Using a compassionate approach and taking into account the diversity of learners, each module of the curriculum offers various learning strategies, worksheets, and activities.  The curriculum covers sexual health topics including, but not limited to, the physical body and changes, boundaries, healthy relationships, dating, intimacy, sexual orientation, safer sex practices, and understanding sexuality.

Providing honest and clear sexual health education to individuals living with a disability enables them to make informed choices and decisions about their lives.  Being equipped with the knowledge of personal rights and an understanding of consent helps individuals recognize signs of coercion or abuse and provides the tools required to protect themselves.  Through Tell It Like It Is, our aim is to empower organizations serving people with disabilities to provide sexual health education and information to those individuals they support.

“This project has been a journey…. we hope that through partnership we can continue to build on the course content while continuing to provide a rich educational experience for diverse learners across our province.” – Michael Lavis, COR

Check out an article about the initiative in SACL’s Spring Edition of Dialect and download the course curriculum here for FREE!

For more information, email Marlene Yaqub at: marlene@creativeoptionsregina.ca