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Dylan Morin is an extremely hard working and dedicated citizen in the Regina community.

Dylan Morin is an extremely hard working and dedicated citizen in the Regina community. His days are filled with student life, working part time for Dutch Industries, and volunteering for one of the countless clubs he is a part of. He makes himself available whenever he is needed and never shies away from a challenge. Dylan is everywhere.

Dylan is dedicated to his studies at the University of Regina. He is currently in his 4th and final year of the Campus For All and plans to graduate in the spring of 2018. When asked what his favorite part of being in school was, Dylan was quick to reply, “Meeting new people!” He also mentioned that once he graduates he really wants to continue his studies at the U of R auditing classes, furthering his education and broadening his scope of knowledge. In his own words, “There is so much information out there.”

At Dutch Industries, Dylan has developed a strong relationship with a family run business that is designed to “bring quality to its customers for generations.” It is this mantra and his personal connection to his boss Greg that keeps Dylan passionate about his work. When asked what he does at Dutch Industries, Dylan said proudly, “quality control and shipping. I package bolts for farming equipment across North America (Canada and the US) as well as the UK and then prepare them for shipping.”

His days are filled with student life, working part time for Dutch Industries

Another reason why Dylan enjoys his work at Dutch is because “they are great at helping [him] balance his time with what is important and the things he loves to do.” Dylan has been an amazing advocate for Friendship Club, Best Buddies, book club, Special Olympics bowling as well as track, and the Wind On My Wings Sailing Club to name a few. Being involved in his community and taking part in special events around Regina is something Dylan truly enjoys. In getting to know Dylan over the past couple years I have learned that his passion for serving others is unmatched. He is a fantastic public speaker and enjoys pounding the pavement looking to connect people and organizations, alike.

Finally I asked Dylan what his dreams were once he graduated from the University. Dylan replied without hesitation, “I make a good pay cheque already. I plan to keep working and saving. I will probably take some more classes but I don’t think much will change.” To conclude our interview I asked Dylan what his dream job would be if given the choice to do anything in the world to which he replied, “I would love to be a flight attendant for WestJet. I think it would be amazing to fly from Chicago to LA or even Vancouver again!” Dylan, with your passion and dedication to doing a thorough job, the sky is the limit.

Thank you for modelling passion and dedication, Dylan! We could all learn something from you.

 

Ben Morris,

Community Education and Outreach

 

Nothing makes me happier than hearing about someone’s success at work

I once heard a George Lucas quote that stuck with me – “Dreams are extremely important.  You can’t do it unless you imagine it.”

When I begin a job search, the first question I always ask a job seeker is, “what is your dream job?” Somewhere in that dream is the perfect job for each person, whether it’s the head coach of the Riders, a free-lance writer for a social media campaign, a chef, a firefighter or Celine Dion’s manager (each of those are real answers I’ve received!).  While I will admit, I’m quite skilled at my job, I may not have the strings to pull to hook someone up with Celine Dion, but I do recognize that within that dream probably lies an interest in popular music, a passion for an instrument, an outgoing and organized personality.  From those traits, a real and meaningful job can be sought.   4to40 prides itself on thinking outside the employment box – focusing on each individual’s uniqueness. No one should be forced to work in a job or an environment that doesn’t make them happy or fuel their passion.  For people who experience disability, work generally is a dream that is accepted as whatever is given to them.  I work hard every day to change that.  When I take individual interests, skills, talents and personalities into account, and then customize and carve roles out within workplaces that are of interest to the job seeker, I open up a whole world of potential for employment.

 

Dreams are extremely important You can’t do it unless you imagine it

Nothing makes me happier than hearing about someone’s success at work, whether that’s an increase in hours, learning a new set of tasks or being invited for beers on Friday after a shift.  The feeling of success at work is so much more than just the job itself. Gaining independence, financial freedom, being a contributing and valuable member of a team, forging real and meaningful relationships.  We all seek these outcomes from our workplaces.  Why wouldn’t the success of 4to40 be measured in the same ways?

For the people I support, becoming employed leads to independence, self-confidence and a feeling of self-worth.  But wait, my role doesn’t end there.  4to40’s partners, the employers we work with, not only see the great value the employees bring to their workplace efficiency, they also recognize how workplace culture changes.  When committed to inclusion – that is, embracing the diversity of every human – employers see that their entire workforce can be more welcoming, patient and empathetic.  Workplace culture becomes more supportive of everyone, ensuring that all talents and successes are celebrated and acknowledged.  4to40 encourages employers within our community to create an environment where all employees feel connected, valued and safe.  Through the support of our project, job coaches and willing peers in the workplace – all these important needs can be met, and dream jobs can be achieved!

Miranda Klinger

Employment Partnership Consultant, 4to40

 

Finding the perfect job is hard!

Jessie loves sport! Being active is a giant part of his makeup (blueprint) so a job at the University of Regina in the athletic department was an obvious and easy transition for him. After more than a decade of employment at a local grocery store, Jessie knew it was time for a change. Jessie’s friendly and conversational nature now thrives on the busy and bustling Regina Campus. “I get to meet a lot of people and chat them up all the time! Sometimes [my friends] come by and say hi which is pretty cool too.”

Jessie’s extremely conversational personality mixed with his natural ability to make people smile makes him the perfect candidate for a role in customer experience. On finding a job that fits his talents, Jessie also stated that, “If I am not checking people in to the gym, my boss lets me clean the equipment and chat with people around the gym. I have a good boss.” Consumers in health services have so many options nowadays with gyms popping up on every corner. Jessie has found a way to make that experience different at the U of R.

I have a good boss

In addition to being able to use his natural abilities every day in his role at the gym, Jessie is able to feed his need for sport after hours as well. Once Jessie punches the clock at the end of his day he is able to make use of the facility. When asked about the perks of his role, Jessie’s eyes lit up to say, ‘I have my own student card and can play ball or sit courtside to watch the Cougars play as long as I am not on the job.” Jessie went on to say with a grin, “sometimes I get tempted to shoot a couple hoops when I’m on break, but I know it looks bad on the resume!”

Finally when asked what he does with his hard earned paycheck he replied, “I save it. I don’t spend a lot. I guess I do want a DeRozan Jersey to wear while I am shooting hoops, but that’s it.” Not only is he an athlete and social butterfly, but he is responsible too!

Finding the perfect job is hard. Feeding the soul and the bank account is often something that we have to do separately; making time in our lives for both. Jessie has managed to find a role with the University that not only takes care of both of these life necessities, but nourishes them as well.

Great work Jessie!

 

To learn more about Inclusive Employment, visit: www.4to40.ca.

 

Ben Morris,

Community Education and Outreach

 

4to40 Press Conference: National Disability Employment Awareness Month recognized at the University of Regina

The University of Regina hosted a Press Conference on October 28th, 2016 in celebration of 4to40 and the National Disability Employment Awareness Month. The event was attended by over 100 employers, community leaders, partners and 4to40 job seekers.

We are proud to have Dr. Vianne Timmons, President of the University of Regina, Michael Hoffart, President & CEO of Farm Credit Canada, and Hon. Laura Ross, MLA for Regina Rochdale, support our efforts to increase employment opportunities for all those we serve.

You are true champions of inclusion!

4to40 Press Conference Vianne Timmons4to40 Press Conference4to40 Press Conference 24to40 Press Conference FCC

4to40 News ReleaseLink to the UofR Article: Celebrating Campus For All

Link to CKRM Article: University of Regina celebrates National Disability Employment Awareness Month

For more information on Inclusive Employment, visit: www.4to40.ca

 

4to40 Featured in 2016 Vital Signs Report: Economic Belonging — Building an Inclusive Workforce

Vital Signs ReleaseVital Signs Executive SummaryClick here to view the full report.

Click here to view CTV News coverage of the report.

 

4to40 is Growing! Now Hiring an Employment Partnership Consultant!

4to40 is a growing initiative! COR, in partnership with Campus For All, University of Regina, are striving to increase inclusive employment opportunities for the people we support. Through the development of collaborative partnerships, we are striving to achieve social and employment inclusion for all those supported through the 4to40 Inclusive Employment Initiative.

Now entering our 3rd year, 4to40 is strengthening the job coach recruitment, training and development of our initiative with the addition of an Employment Partnership Consultant.

For more information, contact Michael Lavis at: michael@creativeoptionsregina.ca or Faith Savarese at: Faith.Savarese@uregina.ca

Employment Partnership Consultant-1

Employment Partnership Consultant-2

Studying the sexual barriers faced by people with disabilities

Check out this intriguing article featuring the research of Michelle Apps, MSW Candidate at the University of Regina. COR is proud to be supporting Michelle in her academic journey!

Article by: Dale Johnson, posted to the UofR website on December 3, 2015

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A University of Regina student is looking into how disabilities affect a person’s sex life.

“I’m conducting research in this area, because it’s often viewed in society as a very taboo subject. It’s important to have conversations with folks experiencing disabilities to see what their experiences are accessing sex, and how they think it could be better facilitated,” explains Michelle Apps, who is conducting the research project as part of her Master of Social Work program. “It’s a very under-researched area, in both disability studies and sexuality studies, so through the intersection of the two I hope to bring a bit more attention to the subject.”

“I’m hoping my research will lead to people with disabilities feeling as if they have a voice in this area and are being heard. I’m hoping to add to the small but growing body of literature supporting people with disabilities accessing sex as a right, and to help dispel the myth that people with disabilities are asexual beings,” she says.

Her faculty supervisor, Dr. Randy Johner, says: “Although many people with disabilities, and those who support people with disabilities, believe that accessing an erotic life is very important and needs to be openly discussed in both private and public spheres, there is a great reluctance to share such sensitive and sometimes very hurtful issues concerning sexuality with someone outside of one’s care circle.”

Apps’ research is supported by Creative Options Regina, an organization that supports people with developmental disabilities through housing and programming.

“They have been instrumental in helping me get in touch with potential research participants, and I’m assisting them with some policy and programming development,” she says.

Apps is looking for people with disabilities, physical or intellectual, to share their experiences with her about accessing an erotic life (defined as any sexually-charged touch and can include cuddling, hugging, kissing on so on), what barriers they have faced, and how they think it could be best facilitated.

“I am hoping to have initial results before Christmas, or early in the New Year. I am aiming to submit my findings to the Review of Disability Studies in the spring,” she adds. “I am hoping that through knowledge translation through publishing and presenting at conferences, that I can help support policy changes at higher levels.”

Click here for the full article on the UofR website.

Click here for the Regina LeaderPost Article: University of Regina student researching sex for the disabled

Click here for the Global Regina Story: People with disabilities still want sex, according to U of R research

 

Dispelling Myths About People with Disabilities

COR partnered with four AWESOME UofR Kin Students on a project for the International Day for Persons With Disabilities (IDPD 2015). Check out this great story about the project posted to the UofR webpage on December 2, 2015. Be sure to watch the video too!!

Article by: Costa Maragos

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Some myths and misconceptions about people with disabilities are being explored in a compelling and thoughtful video produced by four Kinesiology students.

The video production is titled; Inclusion Matters: Debunking Common Myths Around Disability.

“We hope to generate some critical thinking and open-ended discussions about the current myths and stereotypes many people have about people with disabilities,” says Jordan Wirachowsky, one of four students involved in the production. “The overall message is we hope it can change  attitudes towards people with disabilities and create a more inclusive society.”

Wirachowsky, along with Matthew Pacholko, Jason Mo and Jordan Wyonzek, came up with the idea as part of a project in their Kinesiology 342 class, Developmental Disabilities & Well-Being, taught by professor Brenda Rossow-Kimball.

The video has been produced to coincide with International Day of Persons With Disabilities, December 3. That day, the video will be shown to a class at Campbell Collegiate in Regina.

In the video, students, faculty and staff on campus are asked to respond, sometimes with little or no warning, to various statements relating to myths about people with disabilities, including:

  • people with disabilities only like to spend time with others who have disabilities;
  • people with disabilities are more likely to be injured in the workplace;
  • people with disabilities are not independent and are unable to perform tasks of daily living.

“A few individuals gave some real thought to the questions and strived to dig deeper and find true meaning in the questions,” says Pacholko. “Some students appeared at a loss of explanation. Perhaps it was because they’ve never thought of the topic in such a way before or because they were put on the spot.”

Watch Inclusion Matters: Debunking Common Myths Around Disability, produced jointly by Brandon Wu of Strategy Lab and Creative Options Regina.

As part of the assignment, the students were asked to connect with a community organization and create a project that recognizes this year’s theme for International Day of Persons With Disabilities.

The students connected with Creative Options Regina, a non-profit organization in Regina that develops personalized support services for people with disability.

“Participating in class projects such as this helps raise awareness of our organization, while further contributing to the development of a more inclusive community for all,” says Michael Lavis, Executive Director of Creative Options Regina.

The video’s overall message, say the students, is the hope it can change peoples’ attitudes towards those with disabilities and create a more inclusive society.

“A more inclusive society helps build relationships and allows people with different abilities to be valued and shown dignity,” says Pacholko.

 

Click here for the full story on the UofR webpage.

 

4to40 featured in Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce Newsletter

Well 4to40 is at it again! This time it was the Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce writing about the impact the program is having at the University.

University of Regina Supports students with disabilities 4to40 making a dent in Saskatchewan

To download the Saskatchewan Chamber Newsletter, click here –> Jan 2015 Edition