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Canadian Transit at the Forefront of Equitable Mobility

National AccessAbility Week is an important annual event that celebrates the progress we have made as a society to facilitate accessibility and promote inclusion throughout our communities and workplaces. This year, National AccessAbility Week took place from May 27 to June 2, marking a time to recognize the milestones that Canadian individuals, communities, and workplaces have undertaken in order to “actively remove barriers and give Canadians of all abilities a better chance to succeed,” as stated on the Government of Canada. “We need to change the way we think, talk and act about barriers to participation and accessibility, and we need to do it right from the start, not as an afterthought. An inclusive Canada is one where all Canadians can participate and have an equal opportunity to succeed in their workplaces and communities.”

York Region Transit’s manager of Mobility Plus, Sharon Doyle, puts is as such: “Our passengers always come first, and we are built on a foundation of inclusivity. Everyone should have opportunity for independent and spontaneous travel, no matter their circumstances. When people have access to transportation, individuals and communities thrive.”

At CUTA, our mission is to inspire and influence the evolution of integrated urban mobility, and that includes equal access to mobility for people with disabilities. For this reason, we have chosen to highlight three outstanding projects with a focus on accessibility from our transit members, showcasing excellence and innovation in making Canadian urban mobility more equitable and available to all.

Regina Transit: Travel Training Program

Regina Transit is actively supporting people who experience disabilities by offering a program that shows participants how to use fixed-route transit service through its new travel training program. Paratransit typically does not allow people to travel with the utmost flexibility and spontaneity because trips must be booked in advance, and there are specific trip times to adhere to.

Using fixed-route transit enables people currently using paratransit to have another travel option. Regina’s program is unique because it is a partnership between the City of Regina, Creative Options Regina (a community-based organization supporting people experiencing disabilities), and the University of Regina’s 4to40 program.

People experiencing disabilities are hired to deliver the training creating meaningful employment.  For more information go to the 4to40.ca website and click on the travel training tab.

 

View the Full article here: http://cutaactu.ca/en/blog-posts/canadian-transit-forefront-equitable-mobility

 

Finding the perfect job is hard!

Jessie loves sport! Being active is a giant part of his makeup (blueprint) so a job at the University of Regina in the athletic department was an obvious and easy transition for him. After more than a decade of employment at a local grocery store, Jessie knew it was time for a change. Jessie’s friendly and conversational nature now thrives on the busy and bustling Regina Campus. “I get to meet a lot of people and chat them up all the time! Sometimes [my friends] come by and say hi which is pretty cool too.”

Jessie’s extremely conversational personality mixed with his natural ability to make people smile makes him the perfect candidate for a role in customer experience. On finding a job that fits his talents, Jessie also stated that, “If I am not checking people in to the gym, my boss lets me clean the equipment and chat with people around the gym. I have a good boss.” Consumers in health services have so many options nowadays with gyms popping up on every corner. Jessie has found a way to make that experience different at the U of R.

I have a good boss

In addition to being able to use his natural abilities every day in his role at the gym, Jessie is able to feed his need for sport after hours as well. Once Jessie punches the clock at the end of his day he is able to make use of the facility. When asked about the perks of his role, Jessie’s eyes lit up to say, ‘I have my own student card and can play ball or sit courtside to watch the Cougars play as long as I am not on the job.” Jessie went on to say with a grin, “sometimes I get tempted to shoot a couple hoops when I’m on break, but I know it looks bad on the resume!”

Finally when asked what he does with his hard earned paycheck he replied, “I save it. I don’t spend a lot. I guess I do want a DeRozan Jersey to wear while I am shooting hoops, but that’s it.” Not only is he an athlete and social butterfly, but he is responsible too!

Finding the perfect job is hard. Feeding the soul and the bank account is often something that we have to do separately; making time in our lives for both. Jessie has managed to find a role with the University that not only takes care of both of these life necessities, but nourishes them as well.

Great work Jessie!

 

To learn more about Inclusive Employment, visit: www.4to40.ca.

 

Ben Morris,

Community Education and Outreach